Category Archives: Geekdom

Save ‘Star Wars’? Angry Fans Petition to Have ‘The Last Jedi’ Abandoned and Remade

There is a great disturbance in the Force: Angry Star Wars fans are petitioning Disney to discard The Last Jedi, the eighth installment in the Skywalker saga released last Friday, and remake the film.

More than 38,000 fans have signed a Change.org petition titled “Have Disney strike Star Wars Episode VIII from the official canon” as of Tuesday morning, after being disappointed with writer-director Rian Johnson’s continuation of the beloved space saga. Warning: Spoilers ahead.

“Episode VIII was a travesty. It completely destroyed the legacy of Luke Skywalker and the Jedi,” said petition creator Henry Walsh. “It destroyed the very reasons most of us, as fans, liked Star Wars.

This can be fixed. Just as you wiped out 30 years of stories, we ask you to wipe out one more, the Last Jedi. Remove it from canon, push back Episode IX and re-make Episode VIII properly to redeem Luke Skywalker’s legacy, integrity, and character.”

Rey in Star Wars: The Last Jedi Rey (Daisy Ridley) in “Star Wars: The Last Jedi.” Jules Heath/Lucasfilm

To explain at least some of the fan discord, it seems some moviegoers felt Luke Skywalker’s story arc in the new movie—turning his back on the teachings of the mythical Jedi religion—was too much of a departure from the Luke we came to know and love in George Lucas’s original Star Wars trilogy.

One person who signed the petition wrote: “The Last Jedi was humiliating for the Luke Skywalker character. A strong-willed single-minded and focused Jedi was reduced to an uncertain, bumbling, paranoid fear driven hermit.”

The Last Jedi opened to $220 million at the U.S. box office Friday through Sunday, making it the second-highest opening weekend of all time. It was also rated 93 percent fresh on Rotten Tomatoes, the review aggregation website.


But fan reaction has been decidedly more mixed. Rotten Tomatoes’ audience score—based on votes by moviegoers—is just 55 percent. Early Twitter reaction was also divided, as some fans felt it was too different from the past Star Wars films.

Rian Johnson’s movie expanded the Star Wars universe into new terrain. Whereas J.J. Abram’s Star Wars: The Last Jedi was close in tone and faithful to the original movies, Johnson’s script took Luke Skywalker on a darker path, leading to a clash with his nephew Kylo Ren (Adam Driver).

Abrams is set to return for the next installment, currently known only as Episode IX and scheduled to come out in 2019.

 

Luke Skywalker is f@#$king Star Wars!!! What’s wrong with you Disney!!! we all wanted to see a new adventure with Luke Skywalker, but Disney F*&$ it up!!!

More than 38,000 fans have signed a Change.org petition titled “Have Disney strike Star Wars Episode VIII from the official canon”

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> Change.org petition

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The Last Jedi Cast Answers the Web’s Most Searched Questions



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Happy! Premieres Tonight On SYFY!!!

 

HAPPY! is based on New York Times best-selling author Grant Morrison and Darick Robertson’s graphic novel of the same name. The series follows Nick Sax (Christopher Meloni, Law & Order: SVU) – an intoxicated, corrupt ex-cop turned hit man – who is adrift in a world of casual murder, soulless sex and betrayal. After a hit gone wrong, his inebriated life is forever changed by a tiny, relentlessly positive, imaginary blue winged horse named Happy (Patton Oswalt).

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Marvel Studios’ Avengers: Infinity War Official Trailer



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Death By Pokemon Go !!!!

Reckless Pokémon GO players may have racked up as much as $7.3 billion nationwide in costs related to car crashes, injuries and deaths last year, according to researchers.

The mobile game’s geeky devotees have made headlines for causing traffic injuries and fatalities, with players either plowing into pedestrians while driving, or getting hit themselves while chasing Pokemon Go’s virtual creatures into the street.

In a study entitled “Death By Pokémon GO,” Purdue University researchers estimated that players across the country caused anywhere between $2 billion and $7.3 billion in traffic-related damages, including lost potential income from persons injured and killed.

 

The study cautioned that those numbers are “speculative,” but added that, “However measured, the costs are significant.”

Researchers extrapolated their nationwide estimate from police records of car accidents collected in Tippecanoe County, Indiana during a nearly five-month stretch that followed the game’s July 2016 launch.

During that period, Pokémon GO accounted for 134 additional accidents in Tippecanoe County alone, including 31 injuries, two deaths and vehicular damages of almost $500,000, according to the study.

That marked a “disproportionate increase” versus the months that preceded Pokémon Go’s launch, the researchers noted. Including the cost of the two lives lost, the countywide tab may have exceeded $25 million, they estimated.

By cross-referencing the locations of the accidents with the locations of PokéStops — in-game checkpoints that players flock to — the researchers said they found credible evidence that Pokémon GO players were responsible.

In the game, players are encouraged to roam their neighborhoods by foot to find digital creatures that they can add to their collections. The more they walk, the more they can catch.

Many players, however, jumped into cars to take their games on the road in hopes of increasing their odds of catching a rare Pokémon or padding their stats.

There were in total 37,461 motor vehicle deaths in the US in 2016, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration — a 5-percent increase over the 35,485 deaths in 2015.

The study cautioned that those numbers are “speculative,” but added that, “However measured, the costs are significant.”

Researchers extrapolated their nationwide estimate from police records of car accidents collected in Tippecanoe County, Indiana during a nearly five-month stretch that followed the game’s July 2016 launch.

During that period, Pokémon GO accounted for 134 additional accidents in Tippecanoe County alone, including 31 injuries, two deaths and vehicular damages of almost $500,000, according to the study.

That marked a “disproportionate increase” versus the months that preceded Pokémon Go’s launch, the researchers noted. Including the cost of the two lives lost, the countywide tab may have exceeded $25 million, they estimated.

By cross-referencing the locations of the accidents with the locations of PokéStops — in-game checkpoints that players flock to — the researchers said they found credible evidence that Pokémon GO players were responsible.

In the game, players are encouraged to roam their neighborhoods by foot to find digital creatures that they can add to their collections. The more they walk, the more they can catch.

Many players, however, jumped into cars to take their games on the road in hopes of increasing their odds of catching a rare Pokémon or padding their stats.

There were in total 37,461 motor vehicle deaths in the US in 2016, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration — a 5-percent increase over the 35,485 deaths in 2015.

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14-Year Old Video Game Cheater Sued, Mom Says He’s A Scapegoat

Last month, Epic took the unusual step of not just banning two Fortniteplayers from the game for cheating, but taking them to court. It’s since been revealed that one of the accused is only 14 years old, and his mother is not happy.

She has addressed the court directly through a letter, which attacks Epic’s handling of the case on a number of grounds.

  • She says that Fortnite’s terms require parental consent for minors, and that she never gave this consent.
  • She says the case is based on a loss of profits, but argues that it’s a free-to-play video game, and that in order to prove a loss Epic would need to provide a statement certifying that Rogers’ cheating directly caused a “mass profit loss”.
  • She claims that by going after individual players, rather than the websites selling/providing the software necessary to cheat in an online game, Epic is “using a 14 year-old child as a scapegoat”.
  • She claims that her son did not, as Epic allege, help create the cheat software, but simply downloaded it as a user, and that Epic “has no capability of proving any form of modification”.
  • Finally, the mother says that by releasing her son’s name publicly in conjunction with the move that Epic has violated Delaware laws related to the release of information on minors.

There’s also the matter, as TorrentFreak point out, that you can’t actually sue a minor directly, raising the possibility that Epic didn’t know the full identity of the accused before going ahead with the case.

You can read the letter in full below:

 

The cases began last month, when Epic began taking action against individual users who had used (and were allegedly associates of) the site Addicted Cheats to obtain “aimbots” that would give them a competitive edge in the game.

Those cheat services aren’t free, with players paying between $5-$15 a month for them.

Epic has decided to take the users to court, rather than just ban them, after deciding that the modification of the game’s code is against Fortnite’sEnd User License Agreement and the Copyright Act.

“This particular lawsuit arose as a result of the defendant filing a DMCA counterclaim to a takedown notice on a YouTube video that exposed and promoted Fortnite Battle Royale cheats and exploits”, Epic says in a statement given to Kotaku. “Under these circumstances, the law requires that we file suit or drop the claim.

“Epic is not okay with ongoing cheating or copyright infringement from anyone at any age. As stated previously, we take cheating seriously, and we’ll pursue all available options to make sure our games are fun, fair, and competitive for players.”

 

 

 

 

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Pictures And Videos From Anime NYC !!!

Anime NYC 2017 unfolded in NYC this past weekend . For the fans of Japanese animation this was a weekend to have fun, dress up and just meet a lot of anime superfans. It was a fun time there , as it had a better vibe than New York Comic Con, maybe because this was the first Anime NYC con. I can’t wait for Anime NYC 2018, a great time was had by all . 

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