Category Archives: Retroworld

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Nintendo surprised fans with the SNES Classic

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Yesterday, Nintendo surprised fans with the SNES Classic, a mini console that bundles together 21 of the best classic games from the company’s 16-bit console in one tiny package. But perhaps no one was more surprised than veteran game creator Dylan Cuthbert, who learned the gadget would include one additional surprise: his long-canceled game, Star Fox 2. Yesterday evening, Cuthbert and several members of the original Star Fox 2 team went out to have a much-belated launch party for a game they’d made two decades earlier.

Star Fox 2 was a sequel the 1993 original, which saw Nintendo branch out in a new direction with a sci-fi-themed rail shooter on the SNES. In the game, Fox McCloud and a team of anthropomorphic animals / pilots defend their home planet from powerful alien invaders. The game let players pilot an angular craft called the Arwing, as they battled robots, alien creatures, and spaceships through expansive levels.

Star Fox was also one of the most technically impressive SNES games. By utilizing a new graphics processor called the Super FX, the team behind the original Star Fox were able to squeeze 3D graphics onto a console built for 2D games. Star Fox was the first Nintendo game to use polygonal graphics, setting in motion the company’s trend from 2D to 3D gaming. A big reason for that accomplishment was the technical wizardry of Cuthbert and his team at British developer Argonaut Software, who worked with Nintendo on the game.
Star Fox 2

When it came time to create a sequel, the team similarly wanted to make something that would wow players on a technical level. They set to work on not only designing a new game, but also developing a new version of the Super FX chip that would offer twice the memory and significantly faster processing. They experimented with all kinds of ideas, including the ability to pilot your ship using a full 360-degree range of motion. Cuthbert says that he rebuilt the original Star Fox engine “considerably” to fit all of these new ideas and gameplay features.

The game wasn’t merely a prototype; it was completed. The press was even shown demos at CES in 1995. But Star Fox 2 took a long time to develop — so long that the final product showed its age as new, more powerful platforms like the original Sony PlayStation and Sega Saturn were released.

“The release [of Star Fox 2] got set back about a year or so, and half a year later, the Nintendo 64 system was due to come out, so we thought, ‘Is it too late to ask people to shell out for this?’” Nintendo design luminary Shigeru Miyamoto explained in an interview with the late Nintendo president Satoru Iwata. “And other companies’ game consoles were using polygons all over the place, so we didn’t think we could catch up even if we stuck this expensive chip in the cartridge, so we rethought it.”

The decision was made to cancel Star Fox 2, though many of its ideas — like 360-degree flying and the introduction of a tank vehicle — made their way into Star Fox 64, which was released in 1997. “We wanted to use that structure from Star Fox 2 to make scenes with a stronger sci-fi bent, and we wanted to make the Arwing feel more comfortable to fly,” Miyamoto explained. When former Nintendo programmer Kazuaki Morita started experimenting with the N64, Miyamoto realized it was the right platform for these ideas. “When I saw those, I thought, ‘Ah, now we can make it like a science fiction film!’” he explained.

Cuthbert, meanwhile, went on to found Kyoto-based studio Q-Games, best known for the “Pixeljunk” series of experimental games. Years later, Cuthbert would return to Star Fox when Q partnered with Nintendo to create a remake of Star Fox 64 on the Nintendo 3DS. “The idea was to faithfully recreate the contents of Star Fox 64,” Cuthbert, who served as director on the project, explained during the same interview with Iwata. He described the 3DS version as “a rebirth.”

Having moved on to new companies and projects, Cuthbert and the original Star Fox 2 development team aren’t directly involved with the release on the SNES Classic — which explains his surprise at yesterday’s announcement. “I wonder if this is a first?” Cuthbert wrote on Twitter. “We mastered Star Fox 2 [22] years ago and it’s finally getting a release. Guinness World record?”


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zxgames

Gaming nostalgia Time!!!!





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Sonic-Mania

Sonic Mania new trailer!

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Sonic-Mania

This summer The New Classic adventure Sonic game is coming to town!

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Play as Sonic, Tails, & Knuckles as you race through all-new Zones and fully re-imagined classics, each filled with exciting surprises and powerful bosses. Harness Sonic’s new Drop Dash, Tails’ flight, and Knuckles’ climbing abilities to overcome the evil Dr. Eggman’s robots. Discover a myriad of never-before-seen hidden paths and secrets!



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nintendo-playstation

The rarest Nintendo PlayStation console

pic-alex-1Long time ago in the early nineties Nintendo was planning to launch their latest CD base game console but we never got to see the final product. But not so long ago someone did find the Prototype and we now have a awesome chance to explore this mysterious rare Nintendo prototype game console




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Commodore 64 History..

The Commodore 64, also known as the C64, C-64, C=64,[n 1] or occasionally CBM 64 or VIC-64 in Sweden,[5] is an 8-bit home computer introduced in January 1982 by Commodore International(first shown at the Consumer Electronics Show, in Las Vegas, January 7-10. 1982)[6]. It is listed in the Guinness World Records as the highest-selling single computer model of all time,[7] with independent estimates placing the number sold between 10 and 17 million units.[8] Volume production started in early 1982, marketing in August for US$595 (equivalent to $1,477 in 2016).[9][10] Preceded by the Commodore VIC-20 and Commodore PET, the C64 took its name from its 64 kilobytes (65,536 bytes) of RAM. It had superior sound and graphical specifications compared to other earlier systems such as the Apple II and Atari 800, with multi-color sprites and a more advanced sound processor



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The Best Of Davey And Goliath (Videos)

In the 1970’s there was a show called Davey And Goliath, about a boy and his talking dog. The show was produced by a church group, so it almost always aired on early Sunday morning. Every week Davey And Goliath learned a new lesson, and how it compared with Sunday school teachings. A classic show for a classic time. I miss the old stop motion animation of these old shows. I remember waking up on a early Sunday morning to watch this show…..

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Atari Memories Pt. 1 (Videos)

As Friday will be known as RETRO FRIDAYS here on Superfanworld, we will start off with some of my Atari Memories. One of the first video game that I ever played from Atari had to be Superman. I was a big fan of The Superman movies in the late 70’s and early 80’s and everything Superman. Along came Atari and their Superman video game, this was one of the most cheesiest games EVER. The whole game play consisted of YOU as Superman flying all over Metropolis and looking for some bad guys, scooping them up and flying to the jail where you would just drop them off. There was no strategy with this game, as you just had to fly around the same building over and over and over again.   Atari didn’t put too much thought into this game, as they probably just tried to make a quick buck of the popular Christopher Reeve movie. Here are some videos about the legendarily bad game.

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