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Capcom Announces Late 2018 Release Date For ‘Mega Man 11’

Capcom has finally announced “Mega Man 11” and confirmed its late 2018 release date. The upcoming game will be available for the PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Nintendo Switch and the PC.

Capcom announced the new “Mega Man” game during its Mega Man 30th Anniversary Twitch live stream yesterday. The live stream celebrated the Blue Bomber’s 30th anniversary by going through the history of the game and interviewing the original developers. “Mega Man 11” was announced by the end of the live stream and was likely a big surprise for fans since the last game in the series, “Mega Man 10,” was released back in 2010.

“Today we’re pleased to introduce you to an all-new chapter to the series’ storied history. Mega Man 11 brings a fresh new design and incredible 2.5D visuals to the classic series, leaping into the modern era of gaming with beautiful 3D-modeled characters and hand-drawn environments,” Capcom said.

“Everything you know and love about the Blue Bomber and much more is here in a brand-new style! With an expert development team at Capcom, many of whom have been working at the company since the early 8-bit era, we’re revitalizing and revolutionizing Mega Man for a new generation while keeping the series’ tight classic gameplay and the heart of our beloved hero intact.”

Capcom also revealed a short gameplay trailer for “Mega Man 11” and it shows that the game will feature the same classic “platformer” style of game, including boss fights. The developers are simply ditching the 8-bit aesthetic and adapting to a more modern, yet familiar “hand-drawn” background environments and 3D model characters.

Aside from the different style, Capcom also introduced a new gameplay mechanic that allows players to change the look and abilities of Mega Man. When players defeat Robot Masters, they will be able to claim their weapons and start using them on the next levels. The trailer briefly showed this off with Mega Man having a green-colored armor and the ability to drop concrete blocks on enemies.

Capcom also confirmed that “Mega Man 11” will feature returning characters, including Roll, Mega Man’s sister, and Rush, the Blue Bomber’s faithful robotic dog. These characters will be able to help players go through different levels by providing support.

Capcom didn’t give a specific release date for “Mega Man 11,” but the company did say that it will share more information in Summer 2018. Aside from announcing a whole new “Mega Man” game, Capcom is also bringing classic “Mega Man” games to current-generation consoles. All eight classic game sin the “Mega Man X” series will be available for the Nintendo Switch, PS4, Xbox One and PC in summer 2018, accoridng to Kotaku.

For the Nintendo Switch, Capcom is also releasing “Mega Man Legacy Collection” (1-6) and “Mega Man Legacy Collection 2” (7-10) in the Spring of 2018, with Amiibo support, according to Polygon. These classic 8-bit games will also have a new Rewind feature which will let users “turn back the clock” if they make a mistake. The new Rewind feature will also be available to existing owners of the first Legacy Collection on the PS4, Xbox One and the PC in a form of a software update that’s also slated to be released in Spring 2018.

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Nintendo surprised fans with the SNES Classic

snes-classic
Yesterday, Nintendo surprised fans with the SNES Classic, a mini console that bundles together 21 of the best classic games from the company’s 16-bit console in one tiny package. But perhaps no one was more surprised than veteran game creator Dylan Cuthbert, who learned the gadget would include one additional surprise: his long-canceled game, Star Fox 2. Yesterday evening, Cuthbert and several members of the original Star Fox 2 team went out to have a much-belated launch party for a game they’d made two decades earlier.

Star Fox 2 was a sequel the 1993 original, which saw Nintendo branch out in a new direction with a sci-fi-themed rail shooter on the SNES. In the game, Fox McCloud and a team of anthropomorphic animals / pilots defend their home planet from powerful alien invaders. The game let players pilot an angular craft called the Arwing, as they battled robots, alien creatures, and spaceships through expansive levels.

Star Fox was also one of the most technically impressive SNES games. By utilizing a new graphics processor called the Super FX, the team behind the original Star Fox were able to squeeze 3D graphics onto a console built for 2D games. Star Fox was the first Nintendo game to use polygonal graphics, setting in motion the company’s trend from 2D to 3D gaming. A big reason for that accomplishment was the technical wizardry of Cuthbert and his team at British developer Argonaut Software, who worked with Nintendo on the game.
Star Fox 2

When it came time to create a sequel, the team similarly wanted to make something that would wow players on a technical level. They set to work on not only designing a new game, but also developing a new version of the Super FX chip that would offer twice the memory and significantly faster processing. They experimented with all kinds of ideas, including the ability to pilot your ship using a full 360-degree range of motion. Cuthbert says that he rebuilt the original Star Fox engine “considerably” to fit all of these new ideas and gameplay features.

The game wasn’t merely a prototype; it was completed. The press was even shown demos at CES in 1995. But Star Fox 2 took a long time to develop — so long that the final product showed its age as new, more powerful platforms like the original Sony PlayStation and Sega Saturn were released.

“The release [of Star Fox 2] got set back about a year or so, and half a year later, the Nintendo 64 system was due to come out, so we thought, ‘Is it too late to ask people to shell out for this?’” Nintendo design luminary Shigeru Miyamoto explained in an interview with the late Nintendo president Satoru Iwata. “And other companies’ game consoles were using polygons all over the place, so we didn’t think we could catch up even if we stuck this expensive chip in the cartridge, so we rethought it.”

The decision was made to cancel Star Fox 2, though many of its ideas — like 360-degree flying and the introduction of a tank vehicle — made their way into Star Fox 64, which was released in 1997. “We wanted to use that structure from Star Fox 2 to make scenes with a stronger sci-fi bent, and we wanted to make the Arwing feel more comfortable to fly,” Miyamoto explained. When former Nintendo programmer Kazuaki Morita started experimenting with the N64, Miyamoto realized it was the right platform for these ideas. “When I saw those, I thought, ‘Ah, now we can make it like a science fiction film!’” he explained.

Cuthbert, meanwhile, went on to found Kyoto-based studio Q-Games, best known for the “Pixeljunk” series of experimental games. Years later, Cuthbert would return to Star Fox when Q partnered with Nintendo to create a remake of Star Fox 64 on the Nintendo 3DS. “The idea was to faithfully recreate the contents of Star Fox 64,” Cuthbert, who served as director on the project, explained during the same interview with Iwata. He described the 3DS version as “a rebirth.”

Having moved on to new companies and projects, Cuthbert and the original Star Fox 2 development team aren’t directly involved with the release on the SNES Classic — which explains his surprise at yesterday’s announcement. “I wonder if this is a first?” Cuthbert wrote on Twitter. “We mastered Star Fox 2 [22] years ago and it’s finally getting a release. Guinness World record?”


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