Tag Archives: Cable

The Last Scene Of Twin Peaks The Return !

Is this what we are going to see the last scene of the relaunched Twin Peaks which is airing on Showtime. Oz closely resembles the fine town of Twin Peaks. Could this be all in Coopers mind????? Time will tell what David Lynch has in store for us in the world of Twin Peaks.



Comic-Con: ‘Twin Peaks’ Making Confab Debut In Hall
HEXCLUSIVE: Better stock up on a couple cups of joe and some pie if you’re in San Diego later this month because Twin Peaks is bringing its unique weirdness to Comic-Con for the first time.

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Comic-Con: ‘Doctor Who’ Brings Peter Capaldi Back To Hall H One Last Time; ‘Dirk Gently’ To Make Debut

After the long-expected The Walking Dead and Game of Thrones announcements plus Doctor Who back in Hall H, it looked like all the big TV panels were public knowledge. However, turns out David Lynch and Showtime had a surprise for everyone, I’ve learned. With a number of cast members likely in attendance, the premium cabler’s revival of the iconic series created by Lynch and Mark Frost will be appearing in Hall H on July 21 in the afternoon, it seems. Being that the GoT panel is set for 1:30 PM and AMC’s Preacher making its Hall H premiere at 4 PM, Twin Peaks is expected to take the stage around 2:45 PM.

Showtime did not respond to a request for comment. Nor is it clear if Lynch will be onstage in Hall H.

Having debuted on May 21 with a two-episode opener, the technically third season of Twin Peaks has seen the return of Kyle MacLachlan as FBI Agent Dale Cooper and now his evil doppelganger, as well as cast members such as Michael Horse, Mädchen Amick, James Marshall and the Sheryl Lee-portrayed Laura Palmer herself among others from the original early 1990s series.

Also back in the new Twin Peaks, which I called “sometimes intentionally tedious, and amazing at the same time” in my video review, is director and co-writer of the 18-episode limited series Lynch as the FBI’s Gordon Cole and The X-Files’ David Duchovny as fellow FBI brass Denise Bryson. They and other past cast members are joined by a bevy of new additions to the franchise such as Naomi Watts and Laura Dern, who worked with Lynch on the features Mulholland Drive and Wild at Heart, respectively.

Predicting if Lynch will be at SDCC or any moves the director intends to make is often a mug’s game, but the 2001 Palme d’Or winner was in attendance for the Twin Peaks screening at the Cannes Film Festival just a few days after the revival’s cable debut so … guess you’ll have to be one of thousands in attendance at Hall H to find out for sure.

Deadline will be at SDCC this year as well as in Hall H and more as co-Editor-in-Chief Mike Fleming Jr, Anthony D’Alessandro and I lead our coverage from July 20-23.

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Panasonic just unveiled a new invisible television

Since the arrival of flat-screen TVs, there’s not been a whole lot to get excited about in the world of televisions – how many ways can you improve on a big slab of glass, after all? Well, how about by making it almost invisible when you’re not using it?

Image result for panasonic INVISIBLE TELEVISIONThat’s the thinking behind a new prototype from Panasonic that’s just been shown off at the CEATEC electronics expo in Japan this week. When switched on, it’s just like a normal TV. When switched off, it’s as transparent as glass, meaning you can see the wall or shelving behind.

Panasonic describes it as the “future of display screens” – although as you might expect, the company’s staying tight-lipped about the technology behind its transparent TV, just in case its competitors have something similar in mind.Image result for panasonic INVISIBLE TELEVISION

Image result for panasonic INVISIBLE TELEVISION

According to Mat Smith at Engadget, the screen is made from a fine mesh embedded in a glass panel.

Image result for panasonic INVISIBLE TELEVISION

You can slide the panel around too, at least in Panasonic’s demo clip, where the TV performs double duty glass pane of a cabinet:

Because it can be moved around, you can easily get at shelves behind it, or adjust the height of the display depending on who’s watching.

Importantly, the screen uses the latest OLED (organic light-emitting diode) technology, where each pixel lights itself (rather than being lit from behind).

Image result for panasonic INVISIBLE TELEVISION

Traditionally, OLED panels put a thin layer of plastic between two electrodes on top of a glass slab. Because of this, when the electric signal disappears, the slab can look virtually transparent.

OLED technology requires very little power too, which is why panels like this can be so thin. Eventually, tech firms are hoping to develop flexible OLED screensthat you can bend or even roll away.

And this isn’t just for your favourite crime drama or soap opera either – Panasonic’s marketing spiel envisions people using the display to control smart home devices, play music, or maybe even set the mood with a series of themed images.

Panasonic originally showed off the technology at CES in Las Vegas earlier in the year, but the company’s engineers say the latest version of their invisible television looks even more transparent when switched off, and brighter when switched on.

Unfortunately, despite the progress they’re making, it looks like it won’t be ready to buy for another three years or so, according to company representatives.

But that might actually be a good thing – it’ll give us some time to save up for it.

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