Tag Archives: #NintendoSwitch

Pokémon Go update brings a little Ultra Sun and Ultra Moon into the game

Pokémon Go players can dress their avatars up like the trainers from Pokémon Ultra Sun and Ultra Moon, thanks to a giveaway that’s now live in the mobile game.

Ahead of this Friday’s release of the Nintendo 3DS titles, Pokémon Go players can pick up free outfits that are directly inspired by the stars of Ultra Sun and Ultra Moon. For girls, there’s a sun hat, sandals, shorts and a nice, flowery tank top to pick up; guys have new sneakers, shorts, a bucket hat, a tank and, for some reason, leggings to throw on.
pokemon go outfits Niantic/The Pokémon Company

This is the first time that Niantic and The Pokémon Company have used Pokémon Go to promote an upcoming Pokémon game. Even when Pokémon’s popularity was at a fever pitch last fall between Pokémon Go’s release and the launch of Pokémon Sun and Moon, the companies kept the games separate. But ever since a Mimikyu-styled hat appeared in Pokémon Go over Halloween, it’s clear that Niantic is willing to reference the current generation of games — even if we can’t catch any of the Alola region’s monsters yet.

Ultra Sun and Ultra Moon are out Nov. 17.

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Nintendo Spotlight: E3 2017



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Super Nintendo World is coming to Universal Studios, so start saving up those gold coins

You’ve probably had dreams of racing against Yoshi and Wario on Rainbow Road to win a medal in Mario Kart, and now your dream is about to become a reality. Universal Studios Japan will soon add Super Nintendo World — a theme park based on your favorite Nintendo games.In a recent press event, executives from Universal and Nintendo announced new details about the upcoming theme park based on Nintendo characters.

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The rarest Nintendo PlayStation console

pic-alex-1Long time ago in the early nineties Nintendo was planning to launch their latest CD base game console but we never got to see the final product. But not so long ago someone did find the Prototype and we now have a awesome chance to explore this mysterious rare Nintendo prototype game console




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Why Nintendo Switch Mini Is Definitely Coming (Video)

So there’s been rumors about a Nintendo Switch Mini in the works. I think a Nintendo Switch Mini or a Nintendo Switch Lite is definitely coming and here’s why

“Although the Nintendo Switch can be used as a handheld device, we think smaller children could struggle to use it comfortably in that format due to its size and weight. Accordingly, we think Nintendo will launch a lighter, dedicated handheld version of the Switch, possibly to be called the Switch Mini.”

 

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NES Classic System Impressions

The NES was the first console I ever owned. Somehow I had saved holiday and birthday money for over a year to get it (the idea may have been planted by a family member) at five years old, and although I don’t remember every detail of that process, I do recall walking into a Sears to actually get the thing, and subsequently taking it home and playing Duck Hunt.

Although I had played arcade games and Atari before (it’s what presumably gave me the idea), nothing really resonated with me until I played Mario for the first time. At that point, I knew this was something I would enjoy for a lifetime.

Tnintendohat’s a pretty common story among older gamers, who are the target audience for the newly minted NES Classic Edition — a simple, yet effective delivery system for 30 retro games from both Nintendo and third parties alike.

Image result for nes box

  • The Nintendo Entertainment System: NES Classic Edition has the original look and feel, only smaller, sleeker, and pre-loaded with 30 gamesImage result for nes box
  • The pre-installed games include: Super Mario Bros., Donkey Kong, The Legend of Zelda, PAC-MAN, Dr. Mario, Mega Man, Final Fantasy, and dozens more
  • Includes a standard HDMI cable
  • Comes with one old-school, grey-colored NES Classic Controller and an AC adapter
  • Also compatible with Classic Controller and Classic Controller Pro. Additional NES Classic Controllers will be sold separately

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Nintendo Switch Has Arrived !

After more than a year and a half of speculation, we finally know what Nintendo’s NX project is: the Nintendo Switch. The company revealed the first details today via a three-minute video posted to its website. You can watch it above, and read our breakdown of the trailer here.

The Switch isn’t a surprise to anyone who’s been following rumors surrounding the system. It is, as has been reported, a hybrid device — the console itself is essentially a tablet, yet it’s designed to be hooked up to a TV for home use. The tablet has two controller modules that attach onto the side for regular portable play, and they can be detached for on-the-go multiplayer or attached together to form something that resembles a regular controller.

It is simultaneously low-key and extraordinarily ambitious. Here are a few quick thoughts based on the trailer.

  • The name is good! It’s catchy, it conveys the core concept, and it’s altogether new. That’s three points over the Wii U, at least.
  • The hardware is… complex. Nintendo has its work cut out explaining how on earth these controllers are going to be used in practice. The video’s scenario of two Switch systems with four split controllers being used to play an NBA game beside an actual basketball court late at night seems impractical, to say the least. And attaching the controllers to the tablet had better be as effortless as the video makes it seem.
  • The system isn’t aimed at kids. At least, that’s not how Nintendo wants to position it right now. The trailer is all about how the Switch’s versatility helps it slot into the lives of the types of busy, young, mostly male adults you’d find in a typical tech company’s ads.
  • We still know almost nothing about the Switch’s power. The tablet base unit has actual vents, which is unusual for a mobile device and possibly puts the custom Nvidia chip in the ballpark of the Shield Android TV. As for the screen’s resolution or overall quality — or even if it’s touch-sensitive — we’ll have to wait for further announcements. But moving to mobile hardware is probably a smart decision, because Nintendo has been technically outgunned for the past two console generations without having many advantages to show for the low-power approach.

All in all, the Switch looks like a unique product that will no doubt serve as an effective canvas for Nintendo’s frequently dazzling software output over the next few years. It’s a smarter, more flexible realization of the Wii U concept, and I’m going to buy one.

But then I always was, and it’s reasonable to wonder who else will. The Wii U, which was largely a disaster for Nintendo, traded on a similar but less practical hybrid approach where the tablet-style controller only worked inside the home and was used differently across various games. It was mishandled at every level, causing Nintendo to squander the dominant position it attained with the Wii.

Nintendo’s genius with the Wii was to identify and define an untapped userbase, resulting in what was to all intents and purposes a market of one — tens of millions of people bought Wiis that would never have considered an Xbox. But by the time the Wii U launched, that userbase had moved on; the rise of mobile gaming appeared to have captured the same type of customer that would have been interested in a casual console. Or there was the possibility that the Nintendo Wii’s success was more like a novel toy than a game console.

The Wii U was a feeble effort to keep up with the shift of non-traditional gamers to touchscreen gaming, seeing Nintendo losing its nerve and chasing the puck rather than skating to where it was going to be. The system was slow, the tablet hardware was laughable, and the platform was archaic. As a vector for excellent software for Nintendo fans, it was well worth buying; for almost anyone else, it wasn’t. Since its late 2012 launch it’s sold just 13 million units, the lowest figure for any Nintendo home console by some distance.

I don’t know if the Switch can sell any fewer than 13 million units — my suspicion is that that figure isn’t a great deal larger than the absolute baseline of Nintendo fans who will buy every system no matter what. But how many more can it sell?

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