Tag Archives: playstation

ww22

Call Of Duty : WWII Trailer (Video

Activision released a trailer for Call of Duty: WWII today. You can find out more about the game, due for release on Nov. 3, in our in-depth report.

The Sledgehammer Games-developed game takes place during the Allied invasion of Europe in 1944 and 1945. Its story follows Ronald “Red” Daniels, a rookie Private in the United States Army, 1st Infantry Division, also known as the “Fighting First.” A co-operative mode is planned.

Multiplayer modes include objective-based team contests between that are all about taking ground. A social space called Headquarters will also be included.

This new game is a return to the series’ starting point. First-person shooter Call of Duty, also set in World War II, launched in 2003. Four more games followed covering the same time period, culminating in 2008’s Call of Duty: World at War. But since then, the series has focused on other time periods, including the 1960s and the future.

Sledgehammer was formed in 2009 by former members of Visceral Games, best known for the sci-fi horror action-adventure series Dead Space. The company contributed to 2011’s Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 3, which was developed by Infinity Ward. The Foster City, California, company then went on to create Call of Duty: Advanced Warfare in 2014, to mostly positive reviews.

Call of Duty: WWII brings to life some of the most iconic moments of World War II, including the D-Day Invasion of Normandy and the Battle of the Bulge,” stated an Activision release.

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The Best Video Game Remakes and Remasters of 2016


If we’re going to speak on 2016’s best video games, then we have to delve into the ones that returned for the better.

Remakes and remasters are still a trend in the world of gaming (which is a good/bad thing, depending on who you are). Plenty of past titles that didn’t get the appreciation it deserved upon release have been updated for the better. Collections that featured outstanding experiences spruced up those games for loyal/future fans. And even some of these picks we’re about to recommend added in new content and streamlined the experience for today’s gaming audience. Return to these games (that have gotten a new lease on life) ASAP.

These are our “definitive” picks for 2016’s finest video game remakes and remasters.


Odin Sphere Leifthrasir

Near the late-end of the PS2’s life cycle, a slew of underrated and sadly ignored titles graced the console. The original version of Odin Sphere happens to fall into that category. It was Vanillaware’s passion project, which is why it’s no surprise that the Japanese developer revisited it for modern Sony consoles. Odin Sphere Leifthrasir not only updates the visuals and makes the art pop even more, it also streamlines the game’s problematic mechanics for the better. Characters now have the ability to perform more defending/dodging actions, new enemies/bosses were added and the melee combo action got vastly improved. Fans of Muramasa: The Demon Blade and Dragon’s Crown should make sure to check out this quality remaster.

Call of Duty: Modern Warfare Remastered

Call of Duty truly morphed into the FPS franchise to beat when Modern Warfare launched in 2007. While some fans have moved on from the more futuristic-centric entries in the series, Activision made sure to bring some fans back with a remaster of its classic entry. Call of Duty: Modern Warfare Remastered did an incredible job refining the visuals by enhancing the textures and adding high-range lighting. Besides that, the super memorable campaign is kept intact along with its quality online multiplayer suite. The only caveat to getting this remaster is the fact that it only comes as a part of the Infinite Warfare package (which isn’t all the way bad). Might as well get the latest COD with an even better rendition of Modern Warfare.

Ratchet & Clank

2016’s Ratchet & Clank isn’t so much a remake or a remaster; it’s a “re-imagining.” Ignore the lackluster film based on Insomniac Games’ platforming icons and just play this incredible game. Playing this thing will have everyone around you thinking you’re watching the latest Pixar movie. Yeah, it looks THAT good! Along with the amazing visuals, it throws in the best parts of past installments in the series in order to make this the best way to revisit the very 1st game. There’s a bunch of varied action setpieces, tons of collectibles, new weaponry (the Pixelizer is amazing in action) and the game’s not just some easy cakewalk. Take on the challenge of Ratchet & Clank. You won’t be disappointed.

Gravity Rush Remastered

It’s sad to say this, but this PS Vita original didn’t have much of a huge audience due to its portable exclusivity. When the gaming world learned that it was coming to the PS4, us and everyone else rejoiced. Gravity Rush Remastered brings such a vibrant, action-packed adventure back to life in the best ways possible. Of course the graphics have been spruced up even more. But it also adds in all the DLC that’s been previously released (we’re talking a ton of additional missions) and motion controls that’s powered by DualShock 4. Nothing is lost in translation with this quality remaster.

Valkyria Chronicles Remastered

One of Sega’s most slept-on releases has to be their interesting take on strategy RPG’s – the cult hit known as Valkyria Chronicles. Originally released in 2008, this tactics driven experience brought the best elements of 3rd-person aiming/shooting and strategic movement together. It featured a tightly woven plot that delved into the harsh realities of war. If you happened to miss it beforehand, Sega did you a solid by bringing it back to modern consoles. This remastered take on such a strong RPG features redone visuals, past DLC, English/Japanese vocal audio and the same excellent gameplay it’s known for.

The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess HD

One of the more divisive entries in the long-running adventures of Link is the GameCube/Wii entry Twilight Princess. For those who actually enjoyed this darker take on The Legend of Zelda, Nintendo did right by you be re-releasing it for the Wii U. The game’s HD edition features Wii U GamePad compatibility, which makes accessing the map and Link’s expansive inventory a simpler affair. That fancy looking Wolf Link Amiibo that comes with it grants you access to a whole new dungeon (the Cave of Shadows), so there’s a new piece of content there if you’re looking for it. Add in the new difficulty mode and you arrive with the best version of Twilight Princess.

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nswitch

Nintendo Switch Has Arrived !

After more than a year and a half of speculation, we finally know what Nintendo’s NX project is: the Nintendo Switch. The company revealed the first details today via a three-minute video posted to its website. You can watch it above, and read our breakdown of the trailer here.

The Switch isn’t a surprise to anyone who’s been following rumors surrounding the system. It is, as has been reported, a hybrid device — the console itself is essentially a tablet, yet it’s designed to be hooked up to a TV for home use. The tablet has two controller modules that attach onto the side for regular portable play, and they can be detached for on-the-go multiplayer or attached together to form something that resembles a regular controller.

It is simultaneously low-key and extraordinarily ambitious. Here are a few quick thoughts based on the trailer.

  • The name is good! It’s catchy, it conveys the core concept, and it’s altogether new. That’s three points over the Wii U, at least.
  • The hardware is… complex. Nintendo has its work cut out explaining how on earth these controllers are going to be used in practice. The video’s scenario of two Switch systems with four split controllers being used to play an NBA game beside an actual basketball court late at night seems impractical, to say the least. And attaching the controllers to the tablet had better be as effortless as the video makes it seem.
  • The system isn’t aimed at kids. At least, that’s not how Nintendo wants to position it right now. The trailer is all about how the Switch’s versatility helps it slot into the lives of the types of busy, young, mostly male adults you’d find in a typical tech company’s ads.
  • We still know almost nothing about the Switch’s power. The tablet base unit has actual vents, which is unusual for a mobile device and possibly puts the custom Nvidia chip in the ballpark of the Shield Android TV. As for the screen’s resolution or overall quality — or even if it’s touch-sensitive — we’ll have to wait for further announcements. But moving to mobile hardware is probably a smart decision, because Nintendo has been technically outgunned for the past two console generations without having many advantages to show for the low-power approach.

All in all, the Switch looks like a unique product that will no doubt serve as an effective canvas for Nintendo’s frequently dazzling software output over the next few years. It’s a smarter, more flexible realization of the Wii U concept, and I’m going to buy one.

But then I always was, and it’s reasonable to wonder who else will. The Wii U, which was largely a disaster for Nintendo, traded on a similar but less practical hybrid approach where the tablet-style controller only worked inside the home and was used differently across various games. It was mishandled at every level, causing Nintendo to squander the dominant position it attained with the Wii.

Nintendo’s genius with the Wii was to identify and define an untapped userbase, resulting in what was to all intents and purposes a market of one — tens of millions of people bought Wiis that would never have considered an Xbox. But by the time the Wii U launched, that userbase had moved on; the rise of mobile gaming appeared to have captured the same type of customer that would have been interested in a casual console. Or there was the possibility that the Nintendo Wii’s success was more like a novel toy than a game console.

The Wii U was a feeble effort to keep up with the shift of non-traditional gamers to touchscreen gaming, seeing Nintendo losing its nerve and chasing the puck rather than skating to where it was going to be. The system was slow, the tablet hardware was laughable, and the platform was archaic. As a vector for excellent software for Nintendo fans, it was well worth buying; for almost anyone else, it wasn’t. Since its late 2012 launch it’s sold just 13 million units, the lowest figure for any Nintendo home console by some distance.

I don’t know if the Switch can sell any fewer than 13 million units — my suspicion is that that figure isn’t a great deal larger than the absolute baseline of Nintendo fans who will buy every system no matter what. But how many more can it sell?

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gameacon

Video Games : Then And Now !

With the release of the new Playstation VR, I was thinking back on the beginnings of the video game. I came from the generation of the Atari 2600 where there were tennis games like above, pong, centipede and we thought this was amazing. The feeling then of playing video games was something novel it was a totally new industry. No more going to the local arcades to play games, and at the arcades in the 80’s I pretty much stuck with the pinball machines now you barely hear or see anymore about pinball.  

I graduated from the Atari 2600 to the commodore 64 because my parents thought it would help me in school with the different programs for math , which I had some difficulty in . I think I had many one math program for the Commodore and a bunch of video games.  My favorite game for the Commodore was the WWE Micro League Wrestling. 

Now as you can see by the above video, the game was slow as hell compared to today’s WWE 2k17.  But it was a real match that was just made digital and I loved every minute of it. This is all we had, so it was great to us, now I played the same game and was like WTF!!!…But there was a wow factor in these games of Commodore and Atari that is not there in today’s world and today’s video games. We have been made to accustomed to technology where even virtual reality is now like EH its good…..whats next??

I wish we could go back to the time when things had that WOW factor . Maybe we need a new technology to come out like holograms or something to give us that WOW factor back.  The Atari and Commodore were the front runners of everything you see today. From Frogger, Tennis, Pong, Micro League Wrestling they were all the granddaddy’s of today’s technology.  We need the WOW factor back in technology….What will bring that back????

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Rare Nintendo ‘PlayStation’ prototype exists, and can still play games

In what is likely one the most obscure and fascinating stories in video game history, Sony back in 1988 signed off on a deal whereby it would provide Nintendo with CD-ROM drives for the SNES. The thinking at the time was that the SNES, in addition to being able to play standard cartridges, would also be able to run disc-based games via Sony’s CD-ROM technology.

Ultimately, a contract dispute over money and various licensing issues killed the partnership, but not before 200 prototype units of the hybrid device, dubbed the “PlayStation” or “Super Disc”, were manufactured. This past July, a Reddit user posted a rare photo of the device after discovering it in his dad’s possession. Naturally, many commenters were quick to call it a fake.

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